Dig Me Out - The 90s rock podcast
#485: Lilith Fair in the 90s

#485: Lilith Fair in the 90s

April 28, 2020

While the 90s were dominated by the touring festival as opposed to the current day destination festival, the first half and second half had decidedly different approaches. Lollapalooza took a variety of artists from across genres with the intention of exposing artists across differing fanbases, whereas the Warped Tour, Ozzfest, H.O.R.D.E. Tour, and Lilith Fair each narrowed their focus. In the case of Lilith Fair, the simplistic history is that it was a female-centric folk tour, headlined by the likes of Sarah McLachlan, the Indigo Girls, Suzanne Vega, and Sheryl Crow. In reality, over the course of three years, the festival provided a much broader spectrum of female artists, including Queen Latifah, Bonnie Raitt, Letters To Cleo, Liz Phair, Dance Hall Crashers, K's Choice, Luscious Jackson, Nenah Cherry, The Pretenders, Missy Elliott, The Cardigans, Susanna Hoffs, Juliana Hatfield, and many many more. To help us revisit we invited back a pair of performers (Kay Hanley of Letters to Cleo and Jill Cuniff of Luscious Jackson) and a pair of attendees (friend of the show Matt Shiverdecker and show announcer Katie Minneci), along with special call-in guests performer Tracy Bonham and attendee John Cornish.

 

Songs In This Episode:

 

Intro - Angel (Live) by Sarah McLachlan with Emmylou Harris

17:20 - Naked Eye (Live) by Luscious Jackson

24:49 - Surrounded (Live) by Chantal Kreviazuk

34:05 - The One (Live) by Tracy Bonham & telephone interview

41:27 - Not An Addict (Live) by K's Choice & memories with John Cornish

Outro - Here And Now (Live) by Letters To Cleo

 

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Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

 

#484: Less Is More by Even

#484: Less Is More by Even

April 21, 2020

Forging a sound out of American grunge and alternative along with British Invasion hooks and power pop melodies may seem like a recipe for disaster, but on their 1996 debut Less Is More, the Melbourne, Australian trio Even find the right balance. Channeling a Kurt Cobain cadence on one track and a John Lennon howl on another works best when the band keeps the songs short and tight, with plenty of catchy guitar riffs toss around. While we dug the high energy performances that pre-date the garage rock revival to come at the end of the decade, some of the production and rhythm choices (or lack of) left us wanting.

 

Songs In This Episode:

 

Intro - Karmic Flop

14:35 - End To End

19:45 - Don't Wait

26:02 - Eternal Teen

31:29 - No One Understands Me

Outro - Dean Morris

 

 

Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.

Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.
#483: Good Weird Feeling by Odds

#483: Good Weird Feeling by Odds

April 14, 2020

Once the alternative gold rush hit for bands in the 90s, one song could make or break an album. But for every Sex And Candy, Cumbersome or Possum Kingdom, hundreds of other bands failed to make the Top 40 for a variety of reasons that have nothing to do with the quality of the music. Take Vancouver, Canada's Odds, whose third album Good Weird Feeling is a smart combination of alternative guitar rock powered by two strong singers with a knack for lyrical twists. The two obvious singles, "Eat My Brain" and "Truth Untold" never found a home on American mainstream radio, and like so many of their northern counterparts, the band remains almost entirely unknown in the lower forty-eight.

 

Songs In This Episode:

 

Intro - Satisfied

17:41 - Oh Sorrow Oh Shame

20:55 - Break The Bed

24:56 - Truth Untold

31:07 - I Would Be Your Man

Outro - Eat My Brain

 

Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.

Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

 

#482: Music Has The Right to Children by Boards of Cananda

#482: Music Has The Right to Children by Boards of Cananda

April 7, 2020

Though not as lauded as grunge, Brit-pop, the rise of pop-punk or other 90s-centric genres, electronic music evolved throughout the decade as well thanks to subtler sounds coming out of the UK. While electronica and trip-hop each had their moments in the mainstream spotlight, groups like the brother-duo Boards of Canada from Scotland slid under the radar with slightly different takes, theirs being a more chill, downtempo approach utilizing vintage synths and drum machines, tape loops and field recordings. Music Has The Right To Children, their 1998 debut after several well-regarded singles and EPs, takes full advantage of the tools, creating atmospheric soundscapes backed by drum and bass loops that lived-in rather than dialed-up, giving the record a timeless element that so many of their contemporaries failed to achieve.

 

Songs In This Episode:

 

Intro - Telephasic Workshop

18:06 - Roygbiv

20:48 - Turquoise Hexagon Sun

27:09 - Aquarius

Outro - Open The Light

 

Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.

Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

 

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