Dig Me Out - The 90’s rock podcast
#433: Everclear by American Music Club

#433: Everclear by American Music Club

April 30, 2019

By the time of their fifth album Everclear from 1991, American Music Club was anything but a household name. If you caught their single "Rise" on late on night on MTV, or by chance on an adventurous radio station, you are among a lucky few. Considering the musical landscape for rock, where 80s hair/glam metal was still dominant while ascendent alternative had yet to be come a proper decade-defining brand name, it's easy to see why you may have missed it. AMC evokes ideas of genres without ever settling on one, making mainstream classification all but impossible. Touches of Americana thanks to acoustic guitars, but not really any twang. Downbeat and bleak slowcore until Mark Eitzel furiously strums an acoustic in bursts of kinetic release. The album feels timeless, yet could easily be the recollection of a single night of boozing and fury. It did make Rolling Stone take notice, granting the album "of the year" consideration and naming Mark Eitzel the preeminent songwriter of the moment, so maybe it's time everyone else finds the reverbed-out beauty in Everclear.

 

Songs In This Episode:

 

Intro - Rise

15:02 - Why Won't You Stay

17:21 - The Dead Part Of You

22:35 - The Confidential Agent

29:16 - Miracle On 8th Street

Outro - Sick Of Food

 

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Patreon Preview: Max Q by Max Q

Patreon Preview: Max Q by Max Q

April 25, 2019

If there is a new episode of Dig Me Out in your feed on a Thursday, that can only mean one thing - we sharing with you a preview of our latest Dig Me Out '80s episodes. With the help our Patreon Board of Directors and Steering Committee tiers, we're revisiting another album from the 1980s based on suggestions and votes of our patrons. This month we're checking out the 1989 album self-titled album by Max Q. Join the DMO Union for as little as $2 a month and get access to bonus content like this episode, vote in our album review polls, get exclusive merchandise and more!

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#432: Our Finest Flowers by The Residents

#432: Our Finest Flowers by The Residents

April 23, 2019

Neither of us had any previous exposure to The Residents prior to this review, and it's a weird entry point. The avant-garde music collective celebrated their twentieth anniversary in 1992 not by released a greatest hits album, but instead taking bits and pieces of old songs and combining them into new works. The result is Our Finest Flowers, a rather low-key affair that relies on drum loops, synths, some occasional singing, and a variety of randomness that includes both female backing vocalists and possibly acetylene torches. This may be the least "rock" album we've ever done to date, but our appreciation for the material ultimately landed on whether the songs stand on their own, which on a sixteen-track album, unfortunately had a lot of misses for us.

 

Songs In This Episode:

 

Intro - Mr. Lonely

11:48 - The Sour Song

15:18 - Dead Wood

19:58 - I'm Dreaming Of A White Sailor

24:57 - Forty-Four No More

Outro - Ship Of Fools

 

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#431: Blue by Third Eye Blind

#431: Blue by Third Eye Blind

April 16, 2019

With their 1997 self-titled debut, Third Eye Blind charted five hit singles, three that made the Billboard top ten, while moving six million units worldwide. Over a year after the release, they were still logging hit singles and touring, and as we've learned over many episodes, the follow-up doesn't always get the same attention to detail. With the 1999 sophomore album Blue, their limited studio time didn't stop the band from stretching musically, conducting some interesting sonic experiments to compliment Stephan Jenkins rapid fire sing/speak delivery. But 1999 looked very different from 1997 - radio changed, Napster would become a thing, pop music was dominant - was their even room for a jangly rock band anymore? Whether trying to keep up with the times or not, they delivery the most pop-friendly single of their career in "Never Let You Go." While the music takes a leap forward on the rest of the album, the melodies and lyrics either sound under baked or over thought, leading to a potential dreaded sophomore slump.

 

Songs In This Episode:

 

Intro - Never Let You Go

18:47 - 1000 Julys

23:37 - Farther

32:06 - Darwin

46:51 - The Red Summer Sun

Outro - 10 Days Late

 

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#430: Formula by OLD

#430: Formula by OLD

April 9, 2019

Grindcore band Old Lady Drivers, or OLD, ended their four-album run in 1995 with the wildly eclectic Formula. Despite the title, Formula is anything but, swapping heavy guitar dirges for tape loops, synths, drum machines and lots of experimentation. Switching gears from Napalm Death to electronic instrumentals might have failed in the hands of lesser musicians, but James Plotkin and Alan Dubin manage to create a compelling, hypnotic record.

 

Songs In This Episode:

 

Intro - Last Look

14:27 - Under Glass

24:30 - Thug

29:53 - Devolve

34:49 - Amoeba

Outro - Break (You)

 

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#429: New Order In The 90s Roundtable

#429: New Order In The 90s Roundtable

April 2, 2019

When New Order entered the 1990s, they were coming off their first number one album on the UK charts along with two top twenty singles. So what did they do? Immediately split into multiple factions. While the well received 1993 album Republic would produce one of their finest singles in Regret, the 90s for New Order are defined by side projects. For bassist Peter Hook, it started with Revenge and continued with Monaco. For Bernard Sumner, he paired up with former Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr, and brought along a number of notable collaborators from bands such as the Pet Shop Boys, Kraftwerk and Black Grape to form Electronic, while Stephen Morris and Gillian Gilbert formed the slightly passive-aggressively named The Other Two for a pair of albums. Along with our guests, we revisit the entire decade for the band and their various extracurricular activities, and how that impacted the sound New Order in the 90s and 2000s.

 

Songs In This Episode:

 

Intro - Regret by New Order

8:51 - World In Motion by New Order

14:05 - Pineapple Face by Revenge

19:49 - Tasty Fish by The Other Two

28:47 - World by New Order

39:54 - What Do You Want From Me? by Monaco

56:36 - Rock The Shack

Outro - Getting Away With It

 

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