Dig Me Out - The 90s rock podcast
#476: R.E.M. In The 90s Roundtable

#476: R.E.M. In The 90s Roundtable

February 25, 2020

Lots of bands were successful in the 90s, but few reached the decade long highs and success that R.E.M. managed while constantly shifting their sound. Perhaps only U2 matched the same levels of critical acclaim and pushback, album sales and slumps, turmoil and triumph of R.E.M., conquering not only their home countries but stadiums around the globe. In our past "In The 90s" episodes, we've looked back at bands that first gained success and notoriety in the 1980s and traced their path through the alternative landscape of the 1990s, but it could be said that R.E.M. was leading the charge of the underground into the mainstream long before anyone else. As they entered the 90s, they were no longer college radio upstarts, but MTV and commercial radio regulars who would shoot through the stratosphere with "Losing My Religion" of 1991's Out Of Time. The rest of the decade would see them tackle everything from fuzzed-out 1970s glam rock to minimalist programmed beats to Beach Boys-esque harmonies. In other words, they evolved, but in doing so, did they lose the sound that made them stand out in the first place? We revisit the decade with a group of knowledgable R.E.M. fans who walk us through an often exciting and occasionally perplexing decade for the band.

 

Songs In This Episode:

 

Intro Medley - Losing My Religion/Everybody Hurts/What's The Frequency, Kenneth?/Bittersweet Me/Daysleeper

18:15 - Country Feedback from Out Of Time

28:45 - Drive from Automatic For The People

42:36 - Star 69 from Monster

55:02 - The Wake Up Bomb from New Adventures In Hi-Fi

1:09:53 - At My Most Beautiful

Outro - Man On The Moon from Automatic For The People

 

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Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

 

#475: Satisfied Mind by The Walkabouts

#475: Satisfied Mind by The Walkabouts

February 18, 2020

Among the many signings by the legendary Sub Pop label in the 1980s and 1990s, a few bands get tagged with "the first" label. The Afghan Whigs were the first band from outside region to be signed to the label, and in the case of this week's episode, The Walkabouts were the first country (or folk, or Americana, or alt-country) band to be signed to the label. Core members vocalist Carla Torgerson and vocalist/songwriter Chris Eckman started playing together in 1984, and by the time of their sixth album Satisfied Mind released in 1993, the band had built up quite a following and list of friends in the area. Guests include Mark Lanegan of the Screaming Trees, Peter Buck of R.E.M., and Ivan Kral of the Patti Smith Band, who all manage to blend into this uniquely timeless sound channeling some expected artists (The Carter Family, Gene Clark, Charlie Rich) and some more unexpected choices (Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, John Cale, Patti Smith) that all sound seamless together.

 

Songs In This Episode

 

Intro - Satisfied Mind

15:09 - Free Money

20:51 - Buffalo Ballet

23:53 - Feel Like Going Home

28:44 - Dear Darling

Outro - Loom Of The Land

 

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Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

 

#474: 100 Broken Windows by Idlewild

#474: 100 Broken Windows by Idlewild

February 11, 2020

You may ask yourself, why is a 90s-centric podcast revisiting an album from 2000? Well, we are nothing without our listeners, and if they suggest and then vote for an album that came out in 2000, but was from a band that got their start and had several releases in the 90s, who are we to argue. And it turns out revisiting Idlewild's 2000 album 100 Broken Windows gave us an excellent opportunity to look back upon the decade and see how its various sounds and genres were interpreted by younger artists. In the case of Idlewild, with veteran producers Dave Eringa and Bob Weston behind the board for the young band meant channeling the volume and chaos of their earlier releases into a weapon to be deployed skillfully, giving the band a blistering edge and allowing vocalist Roddy Woomble the opportunity to craft unique earworm melodies. It may not make the top 100 albums of the decade or the year, but there's a case to be made for 100 Broken Windows as one of the finest distillations of everything that went right musically in the 90s.

Songs In This Episode

 

Intro - Little Discourage

19:45 - Idea Track

24:26 - Roseability

29:52 - Mistake Pageant

Outro - These Wooden Ideas

 

 

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Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.
#473: Red And Clear by Giants Chair

#473: Red And Clear by Giants Chair

February 4, 2020

It took twenty-three years for Giants Chair to follow-up their 1996 sophomore album Purity And Control with the 2019 album Prefabylon, which we discussed briefly in our 2019 New Albums Roundtable. Though we've covered plenty of 90s bands reuniting a decade or two later to make new records, prior to Prefabylon Giants Chair weren't on our radar. Thanks to one of Patreon patrons we got the chance to revisit this Kansas City, Missouri band's 1995 debut. While the post-punk math-rock sounds fit nicely into our previously expressed admiration for bands such as Jawbox, Shudder To Think and Quicksand, as well as the neighboring Shiner, we didn't expect to unearth a local scene that included Season To Risk, Molly McGuire, Boys Life, and others all dishing out their own versions of angular guitars, tricky rhythms, and indie/emo vocals. Perhaps a Digging Your Scene episode is in the future, but on this one, we got to dive into this three-piece and their unique take on mid-90s post-punk.

 

Songs In This Episode:

 

Intro - Gunshot And The Jogger

11:55 - New Orleans

24:03 - Mother Brother Sister Lover

26:31 - Weed Roses

Outro - Semi

 

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Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

 

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