Dig Me Out - The 90s rock podcast
#511: Dirt Track Date by Southern Culture on the Skids

#511: Dirt Track Date by Southern Culture on the Skids

October 27, 2020

For every obvious major label signing in the mid-90s trying to capitalize on the success of a variety of Seattle-sounding guitar bands, there was an equal number of head-scratchers that seem to make little sense in retrospect. Take Southern Culture on the Skids, a North Carolina rockabilly outfit that had kicked around since the mid-80s, but found a home on Geffen Records alongside Weezer, Sonic Youth, Veruca Salt, and White Zombie for their 1995 release Dirt Track Date. What the three-piece had going for them is a tight unit of skilled players steeped in American music history, smoothly transitioning from steel-pedal Hawaiian influenced ballads to B-52s-esque kitschy minimalist pop. Dirt Track Date may have only made the slightest dent thanks to its quirky single "Camel Walk," but like the swing revival, the attempt at recapturing the sounds of the past comes across as earnest rather than nostalgic.

 

Song In This Episode

Intro - Camel Walk

17:50 - Firefly

22:50 - Nitty Gritty

26:08 - Make Mayan A Hawaiian

Outro - 8 Piece Box

 

Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.

Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.
Dig Me Out ’80s revisits Fair Warning by Van Halen

Dig Me Out ’80s revisits Fair Warning by Van Halen

October 23, 2020

For our latest Dig Me Out '80s episode, available only to our Patreon community, we revisit the 1981 album Fair Warning by Van Halen. While tensions mounted within the Van Halen camp between Eddie, Dave, and producer Ted Templemen, the band explored dark sounds and themes, integrating dirty disco grooves, screaming slide guitar, and synthesizer mayhem that marked a turning point in the Van Halen story.

Check out the first thirty-five minutes of this two-hour and fifteen-minute episode for free, join the Dig Me Out Union to access the previous dozen '80s episodes, vote in our monthly album pick polls, and more.

#510: Whiskey For The Holy Ghost by Mark Lanegan

#510: Whiskey For The Holy Ghost by Mark Lanegan

October 20, 2020

The success of the 1993 Screaming Trees album Sweet Oblivion and the single "Nearly Lost You" may have put Mark Lanegan on the mainstream map, but as a solo singer/songwriter, Lanegan was already successfully forging a different path with 1990's The Winding Sheet. By the time 1994's Whiskey For The Holy Ghost was released after a protracted recording period, the split between the streamlined grunge of the Trees and Lanegan's forays into folk and blues were fully on display. With only one track, the escalating "Boracho," featuring prominent electric guitar and distortion, the album finds more similarities with fellow Seattle folksters The Walkabouts (with whom Lanegan appeared as a guest) than most of his Seattle contemporaries. The result is Lanegan's voice, sought after as a collaborator for decades to come, fully out front, which serves him well while exposing some of the cracks in the instrumental performances and production.

 

Songs In This Episode:

Intro - House A Home

13:11 - The River Rise

17:47 - Boracho

31:18 - Sunrise

36:58 - Ride The Nightingale

Outro - Judas Touch

 

Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.

Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.
#509: Perfect From Now On by Built To Spill

#509: Perfect From Now On by Built To Spill

October 13, 2020

With a major label budget backing them, Doug Martsch and his rotating cast of Built To Spill members made something special with 1997's Perfect From Now On. While his previous indie releases, along with Martsch's original band Treepeople, pointed to a capable songwriter and inventive guitar player, Perfect From Now On raised the bar for nearly every guitarist who studied J Mascis' frenetic shredding, Neil Young's extended jams, or Kevin Shields layered shoegaze. Thanks to the time on their side, layers of guitar intertwine throughout, switching between clean picking and fuzzed leads, backed by an array of studio indulgences that include a cello, mellotron, organ, and more. The result is lush and dreamy without losing its bite, and a timeless record that influenced a generation of artists that none have equaled.

 

Songs In This Episode:

Intro - Untrustable, pt 2

19:36 - Randy Describes Eternity

22:03 - Stop The Show

29:00 - Out Of Sight

Outro - I Would Hurt A Fly

 

Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.

Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.
#508: All The Pain Money Can Buy by Fastball

#508: All The Pain Money Can Buy by Fastball

October 6, 2020

By 1998 the grunge bubble had burst even for the second wave, as sunnier, more eclectic alternative rock fought for radio airwave space against the upstart nu-metal bands and a resurgence of manufactured pop. One of the biggest hits was thanks to the Austin, Texas trio Fastball, whose sophomore album All The Pain Money Can Buy produced the cinematic single "The Way," which along with bands like Harvey Danger, The New Radicals, Imperial Teen, and others provided a momentary bubble of pop uncertainty. Fastball wasn't exactly a one-hit-wonder, charting two additional singles in the top 20. The album oscillates between the voices and styles of Tony Scalzo and Miles Zuniga, who craft concise tunes with enough diversity to touch on 60s pop psychedelics, 70s power-pop and 80s new wave without jarring inconsistencies.

 

Songs In This Episode:

Intro - The Way

27:20 - Out Of My Head

33:38 - Sooner Or Later

48:20 - Warm Fuzzy Feeling

51:11 - Charlie, The Methadone Man

Outro - Fire Escape

 

Support the podcast, join the DMO UNION at Patreon.

Listen to the episode archive at DigMeOutPodcast.com.

Play this podcast on Podbean App